Stream Speakers

Stream Speakers

Jim Buchan

Professor Jim Buchan

Plotting a course for workforce change
Session:
1
Duration:
45 minutes

Professor James Buchan is someone who fits the bill perfectly: he has more than 25 years' international experience in HR and workforce strategy and planning. His previous positions have included senior management with the UK's National Health Service, and policy adviser at the Royal College of Nursing.  Professor Buchan has just taken up an advisory role with HWA, arriving from Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh; he also holds positions at the WHO European Observatory on Health Systems, and the University of Technology in Sydney.

Click here to view Professor Buchan's presentation (pdf)

Ian Crettenden

Ian Crettenden

Meet the health reform ‘map maker’
Session:
1
Duration:
25 minutes

If you’re planning transformational change, you need to know not only where you want to end up, but also where you’re starting from. For the health workforce, that means data – and lots of it.

Ian Crettenden is Health Workforce Australia’s Executive Director of Information, Analysis and Planning. It’s his job to map where Australia’s health workforce is now and in the future – geographically and numerically – so workforce planners can model different strategies (and project their different outcomes). An example: Health Workforce 2025 (HW2025), a groundbreaking report that gives a medium- to long-term workforce projection for doctors, nurses and midwives.

Ian gave an overview of HW2025, and the insights it offers to planners seeking to build a sustainable health workforce.

Click here to view Ian Crettenden's presentation (pdf)

Dr Ian Curran

Here's one anaesthetist who won't put you to sleep...
Session:
1
Duration:
45 minutes

Looking for inspiration?  You're not alone.

Universities, governments, regulators - they've all turned to Dr Ian Curran for ideas, inspiration and innovation.  This is your chance to grab some time with a Postgraduate Dean whose 'rounds' take him far and wide.

Currently Ian heads London's Simulation and Technology-enhanced Learning Initiative (STeLI). It's a 31-million-pound, multi-award-winning initiative.  He also runs a cognitive behavioural therapy program for people suffering severe, chronic pain.  And he chairs the Professional Standards Committee of the Academy of Medical Educators.

presentation coming soon...

Dr Stephen Duckett

Who should pay what for teaching, training and research?
Session:
1
Duration:
25 minutes

This session explored the ins and outs of clinical training funding models - challenges, opportunities, that sort of thing.  So it's just as well we lined up Stephen Duckett to talk!

Stephen has an international reputation for creativity, reform and innovation, in areas like hospital funding.  In Australia he's headed the Commonwealth Health Department, and Queensland's Centre for Healthcare Improvement; in Canada he was CEO of the country's largest healthcare provider, Alberta Health Services.  Stephen is now Director of the Health program at the Grattan Institute.

Generating clinical training places is one of the key challenges facing Australia's health system; as we face this challenge, the input of experts like Professor Duckett will be cruicial. 

Click here to view Stephen Duckett's presentation (pdf)

Dr Shaun Ewen

Putting medical students where it counts: clinical placements in Aboriginal settings
Session:
2
Duration:
20 minutes

There's no such thing as a 'too hard' basket for Shaun Ewen.  His latest challenge is getting more medical students into Aboriginal health settings as project leader for the Leaders in Indigenous Medical Education (LIME) Network program.  The LIME project is looking at supporting the development of an innovative program of clinical training placements enabling more medical students to experience working in Aboriginal health settings.

Shaun is accustomed to tackling issues others might shy away from and past challenges include analysing the ethics of intervention in military conflict situations, researching the role of the medical profession in Chilean politics, and advocating for the plight of refugees in Australia.  Currently he's the Acting Director of the Onemda VicHealth Koori Health Unit, Deputy Director of the Centre for Health and Society, Melbourne School of Population Health, and Associate Dean (Indigenous Development) at the University of Melbourne's Faculty of medicine.

This session covered Shaun's work with the LIME network, its challenges and successes.

Dr Gulin Gedik

Recruiting - and keeping - your international health professional
Session:
1
Duration:
45 minutes

For expertise in this field, look no further... Dr Gulin Gedik is an international heath professional - par excellence.  Among her many achievements, Gulin has held senior roles in the Health Ministry in her native Turkey; coordinated a health reform project in Kyrgyzstan; worked for the World Health Organisation (WHO) at its Geneva headquarters, and at the WHO's European Regional Office in Copenhangen.  Gulin is now team leader for Human Resources for Health in WHO's Western Pacific Regional Office, in Manila.

Gulin has postgraduate training in public health and health economics, plus enormous, invaluable first-hand experience in the practicalities of making international healh recruitment succeed.

Click here to view Dr Gedik's presentation (pdf) 

Professor Lesleyanne Hawthorne

Professor Lesleyanne Hawthorne

Where is our health workforce going, and where is it needed?
Session:
2
Duration:
20 minutes

Who better to guide us through current health workforce migration flows in Australia, than Lesleyanne Hawthorn? She’s Professor of International Health Workforce at the Australian Health Workforce Institute, University of Melbourne, and has spent 20 years researching health workforce migration. That means really researching it – inside and out: global supply and demand issues, skilled migration policy, foreign credential recognition, labour market integration, the study-migration pathway…

This year Professor Hawthorn is keeping herself busy with commissions from the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency, the USA’s Migration Policy Institute, and the World Health Organisation.

Click here to view Professor Hawthorn's presentation (pdf)

Debra Jones

Enhancing what's spoken in Broken Hill
Session:
2
Duration:
25 minutes

For years, kids from Broken Hill with language or communication problems had trouble accessing appropriate speech pathology services.  Fortunately, Deb Jones and her team at the Broken Hill University Department of Rural Health (URHD) realised a solution was right under their noses - in their classrooms in fact.

The 'Spin a Yarn' program they created gets speech pathology students into the schools of Broken Hill and its surrounds to tackle the problem directly: the kids with language problems get invaluable help unlocking their language potentional, and the speech pathology students learn by doing.

Deb is the Director of Primary Health Care at the Broken Hill UDRH (it's part of the University of Sydney).  She's also born and bred in Broken Hill. 

Presented jointly with Professor David Lyle.

Click here to view Debra Jones's presentation (pdf)

Professor John Humphreys

Professor John Humphreys

Leading the way in rural health reform
Session:
2
Duration:
20 minutes
Professor John Humphreys is one of Australia’s leading researchers in rural health. The Monash University professor is especially interested in - rural-urban health differences; rural health workforce supply, recruitment and retention; the provision of sustainable primary healthcare services in rural areas; and the evaluation of rural health planning and policies. 
 
The challenges are many, but so are Professor Humphreys' insights and ideas. 
 
 

Professor David Lyle

Enhancing what's spoken in Broken Hill
Session:
2
Duration:
25 minutes

Broken Hill in far western New South Wales had suffered chronic problems providing adequate paediatric speech pathology services - until the Broken Hill University Department of Rural Health and the community came up with a home-grown solution.

Noting that many children with significant speech problems had difficult getting help, the response was novel - and practical.  It's called 'Spin a Yarn', a program that puts speech pathology students to work in the schools of Broken Hill and its surrounds.  The result: hands-on learning for the speech pathology students; and much-needed help for kids with speech impairments.  The approach has since been extended to occupational therapy, physiotherapy, dietetics and orthoptics.

Find out more from Professor David Lyle, the founder of the Broken Hill University Department of Rural Health whose team has been responsible for setting up 'Spin a Yarn'. 

Jointly presented with Debra Jones.

Dr Brendan Murphy

Helping your workforce work better
Session:
1
Duration:
45 minutes

Helping your workforce work better

As CEO of Victoria's Austin Health group, Dr Murphy's ambit is broad: the Austin group - comprising two hospitals and a rehabilitation centre - is renowned worldwide for its specialist and research work in cancer, liver transplants, spinal cord injuries, neurology, endocrinology, mental health and rehab.  Not surprisingly, Dr Murphy has unique insights into getting the best out of staff in multiple disciplines and multiple settings.  He's not bad at thinking laterally either!
 
Dr Murphy is also a Professorial Associate at the University of Melbourne and a Director of the Florey Neuroscience Institutes.  His former roles include Chief Medical Officer at St Vincent's Health in Melbourne.  He first developed his interest in workforce reform during a 25 year career as a Physician and Nephrologist.
 
Professor (Kichu) Balakrishnan R Nair AM

Professor (Kichu) Balakrishnan R Nair AM

International doctors: a new assessment model
Session:
2
Duration:
20 minutes

Professor Kichu Nair has been instrumental in establishing a new workplace-based assessment model for international medical graduates working in New South Wales.  The award-winning program is the first of its kind in Australia and has transformed the way overseas doctors are assessed in that state. In this session Professor Nair explored the program’s success.

Professor Nair is a consultant physician in geriatrics/general medicine, and Clinical Professor of Medicine and Associate Dean of Continuing Medical Professional Development at the University of Newcastle (NSW).  He is the Director of the Centre for Medical Professional Development at Newcastle"

Click here to view Professor Nair's presentation (pdf)

Professor Dennis Pashen

Thinking outside the urban service delivery ‘square’
Session:
2
Duration:
25 minutes

Professor Dennis Pashen knows first-hand how difficult it can be to access appropriate medical care in rural and remote communities: prior to taking up a position with Queensland Health in 2011, he’d spent the best part of four decades striving to provide better healthcare in Ingham, Townsville and Mt Isa. 

With his colleague Professor Ian Wronski, Professor Pashen has now decanted his insights and experience into the Physician’s Assistants program, which has been piloted across rural Queensland. In short, it aims to train Indigenous health workers, military medical assistants and paramedics to work under doctors’ supervision, and so address the doctor shortage in rural and remote Australia. 
 
Presented jointly with Professor Ian Wronski.
 
 
Michael Penniment

Professor Michael Penniment

Let your broadband do the walking: long distance cancer care
Session:
2
Duration:
25 minutes
He lives 3,000km away from some of his patients, but that hasn’t stopped Professor Michael Penniment delivering much-improved treatment to people living with cancer. The mechanism for this service delivery is the Alan Walker Cancer Care Centre (AWCCC) in Darwin, a satellite of the Royal Adelaide Hospital where Professor Penniment is based.
 
The AWCCC opened two years ago, springing from Professor Penniment’s desire to improve cancer care for rural and remote Australians, including those in Indigenous communities. The success of this ‘hub and spoke’ model can be measured by the fact that it’s doubled the percentage of Territory patients receiving radiotherapy for their cancer. The rate of Indigenous people with cancer receiving radiotherapy has jumped even more markedly - from about 20% in 2009, to 48% in 2011.
 
Session presented jointly with Dr Sabe Sabesan.
 
Professor Cobie Rudd

Professor Cobie Rudd

Enhanced learning through simulation
Session:
2
Duration:
20 minutes

Professor Cobie Rudd is a leader in the field of simulation as an aid to learning. Last year she was awarded one of five National Teaching Fellowships by the Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching; her program aims to use simulation across Australia to value-add the health learning experience. Professor Rudd has also led three HWA-funded projects looking at embedding simulation across the paramedicine, nursing and clinical psychology curricula. Currently she is Pro-Vice Chancellor (Health Advancement) at Western Australia’s Edith Cowan University; in 2007 she established the university’s Health Simulation Centre.

This session explored challenges and opportunities in inter-professional approaches to clinical supervision. 

Click here to view Professor Rudd's presentation (pdf)

Dr Sabe Sabesan

Dr Sabe Sabesan

Let your broadband do the walking: long distance cancer care
Session:
2
Duration:
25 minutes

Associate Professor Sabe Sabesan’s philosophy is simple: where oncologists can’t consult their rural and remote cancer patients face-to-face, they should still be able to ’see’ them - using the latest in telehealth technology. In north Queensland, Dr Sabesan pioneered a large teleoncology network servicing 19 rural centres. Dr Sabesan is the Director of the Department of Medical Oncology at the Townsville Cancer Centre, Townsville Hospital, and Clinical Dean of the Townsville Clinical School at Townsville’s James Cooke University. He’s dedicated to improving rural and Indigenous health in Australia, and in this session showed how a commitment to innovation can help overcome the tyranny of distance and enhance rural work force and capabilities.

Jointly presented with Dr Michael Penniment from the Royal Adelaide Hospital Cancer Centre’s Outreach program.
 

Etienne Scheepers

National health reform - challenges and opportunities
Session:
1
Duration:
25 minutes
Health workforce innovation and reform – a simple phrase; a huge task. So where do you start? Etienne Scheepers is Health Workforce Australia’s Executive Director of Workforce Innovation and Reform – with his team he’s developing a national program that aims to improve the efficiency, effectiveness and flexibility of the nations health workforce. A key to achieving this is working with agencies to foster innovation, develop new ways of delivering healthcare, facilitate inter-professional practice, and equip health professionals and their employers to meet current and emerging healthcare demands.
 
Etienne came to HWA after practising law in South Africa, working in health in New Zealand, and working at a high level with South Australian Health. In this session he gave an overview of just how HWA is fostering change in Australia’s health system.
 
Professor Leonie Segal

Professor Leonie Segal

Leader of the pack: a new approach to health workforce planning
Session:
2
Duration:
20 minutes

Professor Leonie Segal has a well-deserved reputation as a leading light in health economics and workforce planning. Her focus is an evidence-based workforce planning model. In this session Professor Segal described the model and outlined the service, budget, training and education implications of the model, and its applications to regional primary care organisations. 

In 2007 Professor Segal joined the University of South Australia as Foundation Research Chair in Health Economics and Social Policy.

Click here to view Professor Segal's presentation (pdf)

Dr Ayman Shenouda

When Mumbai meets Mt Isa: mentoring for international medical graduates
Session:
2
Duration:
20 minutes

Dr Ayman Shenouda knows about the international medical graduate experience - he’s lived it. After graduating with a Masters of Surgery from the University of Cairo, and a Diploma of Dermatology from the University of Wales, he traversed the globe in the mid-1990s to work in Tasmania. Currently he’s a GP in Wagga Wagga, where in 2009 he was recognised as the RACGP’s General Practitioner of the Year.

Dr Shenouda has helped establish a peer mentor network for international medical graduates new to Australia’s healthcare system - and the Australian culture. In this session he outlined his and his mentees’ experiences, and the lessons to be drawn from them.

Click here to view Dr Shenouda's presentation (pdf)

Beth Slatyer

Developing the Pacific health workforce
Session:
1
Duration:
25 minutes

Beth Slatyer's track record in health reform is extensive, and impressive.  During a long career with the federal and South Australian health departments, she's worked on reforms in primary health, health financing, and the health workforce in general.  The current home for Beth's talents is AusAID, the Australian Agency for International Development.  

Beth shared her knowledge and thoughts about health workforce development in the Pacific region.  

Click here to view Beth Slatyer's presentation (pdf)

Brenda Wraight

Forecasting workforce needs
Session:
2
Duration:
20 minutes

Brenda Wraight is the Director of Health Workforce New Zealand.  She's been instrumental in developing New Zealand's national health workforce plan, bringing to her role her twin passions for learning and development.

Brenda has extensive experience in health; her CV includes managing the Director-General of Health's Commission on Senior Medical Officers (SMO) Recruitment and Retention, and managerial positions with the Ministry of Health.

Click here to view Brenda Wraight's presentation (pdf)

Deborah Law

How to achieve and sustain reform
Session:
2
Duration:
15 minutes

Deborah has been a Program Manager, Workforce Innovation and Reform with Health Workforce Australia since 2010.  Her work in this time has focussed on aged care reform.  Having worked in physiotherapy and allied health in the UK and Australia, Deborah's area of specialisation is delivering service and workforce reform by strengthening primary health care capacity.  Deborah has been a member of the SA Generational Health Review 2001/2 (Workforce, Research and Training and Models of Care work groups); the Clinical Senate (SA); the National Chronic Disease Strategy clinical reference group; and the Australian Health Ministers Advisory Council Clinical Reference Group, Care of Older Australians.

Click here to view Deborah Law's presentation (pdf)

Ian Wronski

Professor Ian Wronski

Thinking outside the urban service delivery 'square'
Session:
2
Duration:
25 minutes

You’re rural (or remote), and you can’t attract enough health professionals to ensure your basic healthcare needs are met. So what do you do? With his colleague Professor Dennis Pashen, Professor Ian Wronski spearheaded the Physician Assistant program, which trains Indigenous health workers, military medical assistants and paramedics to work under doctors’ supervision, and so address the doctor shortage in rural and remote Australia.

Professor Ian Wronski was the first Medical Director of Western Australia’s Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Council, and is now Pro-Vice Chancellor and Executive Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, Health and Molecular Sciences at James Cook University in Townsville, Queensland.

This session was jointly presented with Professor Dennis Pashen.

Click here to view Professor Wronski's presentation (pdf)